Treatments of the Heel

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Calcaneal Osteotomies - Evans, Dwyer, Medalizing, Lateralizing

The calcaneus, or heel bone, plays an important role in walking. A calcaneal osteotomy is a controlled break of the heel bone, performed by a foot and ankle orthopaedic surgeon, to correct deformity of the foot and ankle. 

The heel bone can be realigned to achieve a different orientation, which can correct many different deformities and functional limitations. For example, abnormally high or low arches are deformities that can be addressed with a calcaneal osteotomy. The ultimate goal of all osteotomies is to relieve pain, improve alignment and walking, and reduce the likelihood of arthritis. 

Calcaneus Fracture Surgery

The calcaneus is the heel bone. Fractures or breaks of the calcaneus commonly occur after a fall from a height or car accident. Treatment of these fractures may require surgery.

The goal of heel fracture surgery is to restore the shape of the heel bone as close to normal as possible. Restoration of normal alignment and contour is considered the best way to restore function and minimize pain.  

Haglund’s Deformity Surgery

A Haglund's deformity is a bump in the back of the heel bone. The Achilles tendon runs over the bump. Patients with a Haglund's deformity may or may not have pain. Sometimes, the pain is caused by shoes rubbing against the bump. At other times it can be part of pain of degeneration in the Achilles tendon due to the pressure placed there. It is not always clear how much of this Achilles tendon problem is due to the Haglund's deformity.

If prominence is the main issue, then the goal of Haglund's deformity surgery simply is to make the heel bone less prominent. If the Achilles tendon has degenerated as well, then the procedure may involve the Achilles tendon directly.

Plantar Fascia Release

The plantar fascia is a thick band of tissue that connects your heel bone to your toes. It helps support the overall shape of your foot, especially when standing. Irritation and scarring of the plantar fascia, known as plantar fasciitis, is one of the most common causes of heel pain.

Often there is no one event that triggers heel pain. It generally develops over time and can become extremely painful, especially with the first few steps in the morning. It is more common in women, those who walk a lot and people who are overweight. Risk factors include your natural foot shape (flat or high arch), your activities (walking, running) and improper shoes.